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Cinema

 NESA Cinema YouTube Channel


NESA's Cinema program offers a comprehensive hands-on experience for students in the art and science of this collaborative art. Students learn about the history and function of cinema and animation, film production techniques, film scripting, and composition. Our filmmakers produce works for presentation in national-level competitions. Advanced students research, write, direct, and edit documentaries, fiction films, and animation pieces.

Cinema graduates have attended UCLA, NYU's Tisch School of the Arts, the Art Institute of Chicago, California Institute of the Arts, Savannah College of Art & Design, Loyola University at Chicago, UT Arlington, St. Mary's University, and St. Edwards University.


CINEMA CURRICULUM

CINEMA THEORY & AESTHETICS I

In this course, students will study the history of animation and cinema, including technological and aesthetic developments over time. Students will also deepen their understanding of the techniques of cinema through the study and analysis of various film genres. Hands-on projects will allow students to explore a variety of animation techniques, including hand-drawn, stop motion and digital processes. By viewing, studying, discussing and writing about film, students develop and demonstrate skills in technological, cultural, and media literacy, as well as critical thinking and problem solving.

CINEMA STUDIO I
In this course, students will use state of the art technology and equipment to learn and practice filmmaking techniques that will become the foundation of their later courses in this program. First year students are introduced to the basics of filmmaking – film language, camera operation, audio recording, and editing. Students will also learn and practice pre-production processes through the creation of storyboards and short scripts. Since filmmaking is a collaboration of contributors, emphasis is placed on teamwork, reliability, responsibility, and active engagement in all aspects of group projects.
 
CINEMA THEORY & AESTHETICS II
This course enhances students’ understanding of the conceptual and aesthetic aspects of filmmaking. Through the analysis of the works of master filmmakers, students will deepen their appreciation of cinematography, editing, the use of sound, narrative structure, character development, and the historical development of global cinema. Students will develop their use of film language through film critiques and written analyses.
 
CINEMA STUDIO II
In this course, students engage in the creative and collaborative processes of filmmaking through the application of technical skills learned in their first year Cinema courses. Second year students further develop their technical filmmaking skills on industry-standard equipment and software, by engaging in a series of advanced units – audio design, screenwriting, cinematography and lighting. Students will apply these skills to the production of original short films (narrative, experimental, and documentary). Every student works as crew on their peers’ films. Originality, self-confidence, critical thinking, and a professional work ethic are nurtured.
 
CINEMA THEORY & AESTHETICS III
Students will intensively study, analyze and write about master works by filmmakers throughout a variety of genres, cultures and time periods.
 
CINEMA STUDIO III
In this course, students engage in the creative process of filmmaking through the application of technical skills learned in their first and second year Cinema courses, and will continue to build artistic habits and develop their vision as an artist through the creative process. Students will extend their knowledge and mastery of advanced digital editing technology and techniques, including sound editing and mixing, to edit their digital films.
 
CINEMA THEORY & AESTHETICS IV
Students will further intensively study, analyze and write about master works by filmmakers throughout a variety of genres, cultures and time periods.
 
CINEMA STUDIO IV
Students direct in-class exercises focusing on the dynamics of a scene, communicating with actors, blocking, and capturing action and performance with the camera. Those lessons are then transferred to their outside productions. Students in this class will plan and implement two film festivals during the school year, in addition to submitting their own films to other film festivals.