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Frequently Asked Questions

If you have questions or input about NEISD's Facility Planning Process, please email facilityplanning@neisd.net


Throughout the district's facilities planning process, questions are being collected in community meetings and by email. This page will post frequently asked questions from throughout the process.



[04.17.15]

Do the existing secondary schools have enough space for the anticipated elementary influx as the incoming population ages?

Yes. With the addition of Tex Hill Middle School, we believe we have enough classroom capacity to handle student growth for the next 10 years. In terms of high school capacity, district-wide we have enough capacity, but options for portable buildings at certain campuses will help to maintain existing boundaries for many years to come.

How [do potential enrollment growth numbers from undeveloped property] impact middle school and high school enrollment?

Potential student enrollment and undeveloped properties impact middle and high schools similarly to elementary schools. Tex Hill Middle School was built in anticipation of this impact and was intentionally left with a boundary that will allow new development to flow into the school. The District does not foresee a need for a new high school in the near future. District-wide, we have enough capacity at the high school level with options for portable buildings at certain campuses.

Bulverde Creek is projected to reach 2000 students. What is the capacity?

The core capacity of Bulverde Creek Elementary, which includes cafeteria, gym and library facilities, is just below 1300 students. To reach this core capacity, portable classrooms would need to be added to the campus. Bulverde Creek Elementary School’s attendance zone is currently 3.6 times larger than the average elementary boundary in NEISD. District staff estimates that Bulverde Creek Elementary will approach 95% classroom utilization as early as the 2017-2018 school year. When properties such as Yates, KB, and Schwab fully develop, it could contribute to the Bulverde Creek Elementary enrollment to such an extent that the enrollment could surpass 2,000 students at the latest by the year 2023-2024.

Was Yates [property] purchased by a developer or did owner file plan?

The Yates tract north of 1604 has not been sold. However, a Master Planned Community District (MPCD) was presented and approved by the Zoning Commission on January 21, 2014. The plan for 800 acres approved rezoning of the property as Residential (R1), Multi Family (MF), and Commercial (C).

At what point, if any, is the student population projected to decline? Which is to say, is there a point in the next four decades that NEISD is expected to have excess facility infrastructure?

There are many variables that can influence student enrollment projections because parents have choice in educational services. For example, will the city of San Antonio continue to fund PK 4 SA or will those students return to their public school? Will Charter schools continue to be built in the San Antonio area and at what rate will students return to NEISD? Will the State maintain current program requirements?

There is a probability that the District will be built out within the next four decades. However, it is too difficult to predict if there will be some under utilized campuses or excess facilities within NEISD over the next four decades.

Did the survey indicate support for a new elementary?

The survey results show support and uncertainty among respondents. More than 6,500 parents, students, staff and taxpayers participated in an online survey that included a question, “A new elementary school is needed to meet student enrollment growth north of Loop 1604, east of highway 281, and south of Evans Road.” The results are below:


  STRONGLY AGREE AGREE DISAGREE STRONGLY DISAGREE UNSURE TOTAL
ENGLISH 973 (15.05%) 1702 (26.33%) 691 (10.69%) 307 (4.75%) 2792 (43.19%) 6465
SPANISH 18 (22.22%) 23 (28.40%) 11 (13.58%) 8 (9.88%) 21 (25.93%) 81
If Heroes [Stadium] was built to eliminate Thursday night football, why were there games on Thursday night this school year?

Prior to Heroes Stadium opening, football games were held on Thursday nights and Saturday afternoons nearly every week during football season. Today, one or two games are scheduled on Thursdays during the entire football season. North East ISD only has two Thursday nights scheduled for the 2015-2016 season. The first is the annual Churchill v. Clark game, which kicks off football season in San Antonio. This game is always held on a Thursday night to honor tradition and is the highlight for many alumni and current students.

The second Thursday night is scheduled on November 5, 2015 at Heroes stadium between Johnson and MacArthur. This is scheduled on a Thursday night to ensure that no team plays on a Saturday during the last week of regular season play. Playoffs start the next week, and we do not want a team who plays on Saturday to be forced to play on the following Thursday night (that is a possibility) without time to rest, recuperate and prepare for the playoff opponent. Saturday to Thursday is a very short turnaround time for any team, let alone a playoff team competing to advance to a state title.

An additional benefit of games held on Thursdays is the opportunity to participate in a Thursday Night Lights TV broadcast, which positively highlights athlete and student involvement. The broadcast features a scholar athlete of the week and provides a grant to the school band with the highest number of votes during the season.

Will our school buses ever just use CNG and be more environmentally friendly?

The District has been reviewing, researching, and monitoring the option of using alternative fuel buses, such as Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) and propane, for more than a decade. A regular 71 passenger conventional bus with air conditioning costs on average $101,000 for propane and $150,000 for CNG compared to $92,000 for diesel. In order to maintain fleet integrity; minimize overall maintenance/repair and material (supply/inventory) costs; and avoid various expenses associated with infrastructure and alternative fuel filling stations costs, NEISD has continued the purchase of diesel engine buses.

Additionally and to answer the question more directly, all of our buses meet EPA emissions standards that are comparable to those of alternative fuel buses, based on year-model and date of implementing guidelines. Our recently purchased buses conform to current EPA standards (advanced exhaust and catalytic converter systems) dated from 2007 to present. Buses with a prior year-model date of 2007 have been retrofitted with devices that reduce particulate matter emissions, which were approved, funded, and administered by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. Also, federal mandated legislation requires school buses to use ultra-low sulfur diesel, which further contributes to reduced exhaust emissions.

Transportation Department personnel will continue to attend and participate in industry conferences, seminars and webinars in order to make the best possible decisions to operate and maintain a safe, economical bus fleet that meets federal, state, and local Alamo Area Council of Governments (AACOG) air quality guidelines and initiatives, while remaining budget prudent.

Do we give any of our bond money to private schools?

No. We do not give any revenue from our debt service tax rate to private schools.

[Is it] the current residence taxes that will provide funding?

Bonds are funded through the I&S (debt service) tax levy and paid over a series of years. The current tax revenue is used for this year’s debt payments. The District will analyze the I&S tax impact for any future bond programs, which will take into consideration property values at the time of expected bond sale. Any future property development or growth will add to the revenue that is generated to pay off debt or could result in a lower I&S tax rate for existing properties.

What is “at risk” students?

The AT-RISK-INDICATOR-CODE indicates whether a student is currently identified as at-risk of dropping out of school using state-defined criteria only (TEC §29.081, Compensatory and Accelerated Instruction).

A student at-risk of dropping out of school includes each student who is under 26 years of age and who:

  • is in prekindergarten, kindergarten or grade 1, 2, or 3 and did not perform satisfactorily on a readiness test or assessment instrument administered during the current school year;
  • is in grade 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, or 12 and did not maintain an average equivalent to 70 on a scale of 100 in two or more subjects in the foundation curriculum during a semester in the preceding or current school year or is not maintaining such an average in two or more subjects in the foundation curriculum in the current semester;
  • was not advanced from one grade level to the next for one or more school years; (Note: From 2010-2011 forward, TEC 29.081 (d-1) excludes from this criteria prekindergarten or kindergarten students who were not advanced to the next grade level as a result of a documented request by the student’s parent.)
  • did not perform satisfactorily on an assessment instrument administered to the student under TEC Subchapter B, Chapter 39, and who has not in the previous or current school year subsequently performed on that instrument or another appropriate instrument at a level equal to at least 110 percent of the level of satisfactory performance on that instrument;
  • is pregnant or is a parent;
  • has been placed in an alternative education program in accordance with TEC §37.006 during the preceding or current school year;
  • has been expelled in accordance with TEC §37.007 during the preceding or current school year;
  • is currently on parole, probation, deferred prosecution, or other conditional release;
  • was previously reported through the Public Education Information Management System (PEIMS) to have dropped out of school;
  • is a student of limited English proficiency, as defined by TEC §29.052;
  • is in the custody or care of the Department of Protective and Regulatory Services or has, during the current school year, been referred to the department by a school official, officer of the juvenile court, or law enforcement official;
  • is homeless, as defined NCLB, Title X, Part C, Section 725(2), the term “homeless children and youths”, and its subsequent amendments; or
  • resided in the preceding school year or resides in the current school year in a residential placement facility in the district, including a detention facility, substance abuse treatment facility, emergency shelter, psychiatric hospital, halfway house, or foster group home.
Is there any protocol in place for lower socio-economic schools without strong PTA donations to ensure they are maintaining their “equal” status as compared to other schools receiving higher PTA donations to improve their campus?

North East ISD PTA organizations are separate entities and not financially affiliated with the District. The local school’s PTA is managed by a Board of Officers elected by the membership. The local PTA Board and membership determine where the funds are spent or donated. North East ISD does not have the authority to re-direct PTA funds based on the socio-economic condition of the campus or the strength of the local PTA.

However, the District understands the financial challenges of the schools in low income areas and their ability to fund raise. As part of the Transforming the Future process, district funding formulas were adjusted for the 2014-2015 school year. The adjustment provided an increase of more than $400,000 annually to campuses, the majority of which went to campuses with higher populations of at-risk and economically disadvantaged students.

The new recommendations by the Department of Education and Homeland Security are RUN, HIDE, FIGHT for an active shooter. When is NEISD going to investigate these new recommendations?

North East ISD has a Safety & Security Committee that meets quarterly to address best practices in all areas of Emergency and Critical incident Planning, including those involving how to respond when an active shooter is in the vicinity. We have utilized the training information provided through the US Department of Homeland Security that addresses active shooter preparedness, including the principles of RUN, HIDE, and FIGHT. We have also trained with a similar program called the “ADD Survival System” that teaches:

  • AVOID detection by the Gunmen
  • DENY access to the area you control
  • DEFEND - Refuse to be a victim, Fight for your life, Empower yourself to survive

The Fight/Defend response to a shooter, as identified in the U.S. Department of Homeland Security literature, is implemented as a last resort under the guidance of teachers and other staff to protect and direct students under their supervision. Additionally, the North East Police Department attends training periodically to stay abreast of current recommendations.



[04.20.15]

How do you determine which portables to replace with permanent space next?

The District utilizes a number of criteria in determining how campuses are selected for removal of portable classroom buildings and construction of a permanent classroom addition project:

  • Total number of classroom portables located at the campus
  • Purpose of the portables, such as to address future growth or new anticipated program requirements
  • Age of the campus
  • Percentage of the overall student population housed in portable classrooms compared to permanent classroom areas
Our campus has had portables for the 10 years that my family has attended this school. This temporary solution has been used too long.

The District currently owns 270 portable classroom buildings dispersed at 48 campuses. On average, this results in approximately 5 to 6 portables at each of the 48 campuses. While is it not optimal nor our goal to install portable classroom buildings at existing campuses for long durations (in the case of your comment 10 years), only some can be retired and put out of service in each bond program due to overall cost to build new permanent classroom buildings.

Ed White Building was built in 1970. This is almost 50 years that the corp. of engineers puts as max, as Gary Sullivan mentioned. What is the plan for Ed White’s full replacement? Security in our neighborhood of Windcrest is highly important.

Ed White Middle School has benefited from new facility improvements in each of the previous five Bond Programs (spanning 20 years), with a total bond investment of $32.2 million. Our approach to address facility equity issues at the older campuses is to systematically modernize and/or replace the campus infrastructure through a combination of new facility additions as well as planned renovation projects. There is no plan to fully replace Ed White MS at this time; however, the campus will be considered in the deliberations for construction work in future bond programs.

How is the “minimum” standard for the District defined when it comes to facilities? Who determines which schools do not meet that standard?

The District has an established facility standard for elementary, middle, and high school campuses. When considering new projects at existing campuses, the facility planning process utilizes the District facility standards as the benchmark for developing the design concept and plan. The determination of which facilities don’t meet the minimum standard is done through the collaboration of multiple departments, including Construction Management and Engineering, Facility Maintenance, Technology Services and others, based on their specific area of expertise. Ultimately, addressing facility needs of a significant nature is handled through a bond program with input from the community.

What is the plan for older schools currently in NEISD that still have paneling and were built in 1970?

The plan for addressing existing paneling in older schools is similar to any other type of finished building material surfaces encountered throughout the District. The paneling will be maintained in a satisfactory condition and manner that presents an acceptable appearance. Defective building finishes will be considered for replacement by the Facility Maintenance and/or the Engineering Departments. Unsafe conditions will be addressed expeditiously and handled on a priority basis. The District operating budget is not adequate to replace all finish building materials Districtwide due to age of facilities; however, replacement of these older finishes can be considered in future bond program projects.

How will you evaluate and determine equity between campuses?

The recently completed 2015 Facility Needs Survey will be the primary instrument utilized to determine and assess facility inequalities between campuses. Additionally, campus site visits will be used to further evaluate specific facility needs in greater depth as initially identified by the Facility Needs Survey assessment.

When will the District address the lack of bathrooms, locker room, A/C needs at Lee High School Dance and Cheer facility as the girls need those additions now?

The District is currently undergoing a facility planning process to identify the top needs for consideration in a future bond program. Both the campus Principal and Executive Director of Fine Arts have listed the Lee Dance Facility as one of their top 10 needs for consideration in support of a future bond project. The decision to include the Lee Dance Facility as a proposed upgrade or facility replacement project will be ultimately determined by the Facility Steering Committee and Board of Trustees.

Do you ever review or ask the PTAs what they have funded for the school to get ideas of what might be needed, as some PTA’s have more funds for their school than others?

Periodically, campus PTA Leaders meet with representatives of the Construction Management and Engineering Department to coordinate campus project initiatives. This is currently not a scheduled practice with all campus PTAs, but rather handled on a campus-by-campus basis when contacted by the PTA or Principal.

How often are school all-weather surface tracks re-done?

Properly maintained, our high school all-weather surface tracks have a life expectancy of between 7 to 10 years before repairs or refurbishments to the tracks are necessary. The high school all-weather surface tracks were installed as part of the 1998 Bond Program. Since their initial installation (~ 15 years ago), the majority of District high school tracks have benefited from a full repair/refurbishment project. The next repair/refurbishment project for high school tracks will be necessary in the next two-year planning window to properly maintain these tracks and extend their overall life expectancy.

We appreciate the removal of the portables! Thank you! It is so much better for the kiddos and teachers.

The District has invested significant bond dollars in each of the past three bond programs (2003, 2007, and 2011) to construct new classroom additions at older campuses replacing portable classroom buildings. The District anticipates continuing this program of portable classroom replacement in future bond programs, as well.

How and who will check to ensure that there will be technology equally to all schools? Who/what will ensure?

All technology items in the 2011 Bond were based and awarded upon the idea of equity throughout the entire District. Using existing campus technology quantities, the majority of the $64 million technology portion of the 2011 Bond package was used to establish the following District technology standard.

All instructional areas on a campus will have no less than the following:

  • 1 interactive whiteboard
  • 1 document camera
  • 3 iPads

The classroom technology identified in a future Bond election would provide equity in two ways. First, any additions to the current quantity of classroom technology, established by the 2011 Bond, would again be realized at every campus. Second, we would attempt to replace older/obsolete technology at various campuses, which will result in all campuses having technology equality in the terms of both quantity and device functionality.

How will equitable technology be rolled out?

The District has experience with a technology “roll out” of significant proportions, and it requires collaboration and careful planning between District departments and campuses. The deployment has to allow for multiple factors, including limiting the disruption in classroom instruction. Additionally, the deployment of large amounts of new technology is based upon the following factors:

  • Product availability
  • Vendor shipping timelines
  • Internal receiving, processing and inventory procedures
  • Modification of the equipment’s system to allow District staff to manage updates, installation, etc. from a centralized district system regardless of where the equipment is located
  • End-user training
  • Internal delivery scheduling

In addition to the above mentioned logistics, we attempt to schedule the earliest round of deliveries to campuses with the oldest technology currently in use.

Will there be provision for charging stations [for smartphones] to be included in master planning of your facilities?

Outside of the current practice of installing District-issued equipment charging stations in new classroom construction, there are no plans regarding charging stations for personal electronic devices at this time.



[05.01.15]

Is there an Excel spreadsheet for easier review to notify the schools and the bond projects by school and year, cross referencing the year the school was built?

Complete project information on each campus bond project is included on the Construction/Bond web site. From this page, users can view projects by school or facility under the link Bond Projects or review all of the projects for a specific program under Bond Programs. Additionally, a history of bond programs presentation was given at the recent March 30, 2015 Facility Planning Community Meeting.

Is there any future provision in NEISD for language learning technologies (i.e language labs, language learning smartphone apps, networked courseware)?

During the district's facility needs survey to principals and district staff, language labs were identified as a potential need at middle and high school campuses where foreign language instruction is available. The facility needs survey results were shared with the Facility Steering Committee, a group of 36 parents and community members who are guiding the district through a facility planning process. The Facility Steering Committee will help identify projects for a future bond program.

Can bond funds pay for police officers?

Bond funds generated by the I&S (debt service) tax rate cannot be used for employee salaries. The Maintenance & Operations (M&O) tax revenue funds the day-to-day operations of the school district, which includes employee salaries.

When will a breakdown of what is included in each budget level be presented?

A preliminary Facility Steering Committee Recommendation of projects for each of the five Project Categories – Safety and Security, Technology, Operations, Extracurricular and Facilities – will be presented at the community meetings on May 19 and May 20. View community meeting information.

Will the district be looking toward renewable energy such as solar or wind anytime soon?

The District is exploring participation in a solar energy pilot project with CPS energy, which is still under development. The project may include installation of solar panels on rooftops in exchange for a reduction in cost per kilowatt hour.

Can the bond be used to pay for a program to teach children character and virtues to decrease bullying, racism, and violence?

Bond funds generated by the I&S (debt service) tax rate cannot pay for a character development program. The district’s Maintenance & Operations (M&O) tax revenue funds the day-to-day operations of the school district, which includes employee salaries, instructional programs, etc.

Would the new NESA complex still be located on the Lee campus?

Yes. The North East School of the Arts (NESA) facilities will be located on the Lee High School campus.

Is it true that more [parent] voices determine what issues get addressed?

Throughout the facilities planning process, the District has been gathering data through facility needs survey and community input to identify the greatest areas of need across the District. This information is shared with the Facility Steering Committee, a group of 36 parents and community members who are guiding the district through a facility planning process. The Facility Steering Committee will help identify projects for a future bond program.

Why can't a school get a food truck for lunches?

Bond funds are used strictly for kitchen and cafeteria upgrades/renovations and not for mobile food service options. The District is exploring alternative ways to reach students in the areas where they congregate at lunch. We have already instituted mobile food carts at breakfast, and these carts may also be utilized at lunch in the future if there is a need.



[05.14.15]

Why do some campuses have proxy tags while others don't?

Door access control systems, such as Proxy Tags, have been added during construction of new schools and facilities and major renovations to older schools. During the facility planning process, door access control will be an important topic of discussion in enhancing building security and safety.

Are covered walkways considered a safety concern? Some schools have none.

Covered walkways do allow schools to provide shade from the sun and cover during a rain storm. In previous years, administrators on older campuses not having covered walkways addressed extreme weather conditions by allowing students to remain in the building during dismissal until their mode of transportation, school bus, or private vehicle was in place to pick them up. As funds became available the District added covered walkways. One recent example is Coker Elementary School where the student pick-up now has a covered walkway as a result of the 2011 Bond Program.

Are cameras effective enough to warrant the expense?

Yes, the District receives requests regularly for video that was captured on cameras located at all of our campuses. The North East Police Department (NEPD) also uses cameras and video footage to help solve crimes that occur on our campuses.

The older cameras have poor recording quality that limits the ability of NEPD officers and campus administrators to identify individuals or view specific events clearly. The older cameras also skip during replay, and we miss certain things.

Can an [additional] AED be put on campus? It seems one on the far end of the campus could be an issue in an emergency.

The Texas Health & Safety Code mandates that “each school district shall make available at each campus in the District at least one automated external defibrillator, as defined by the Health & Safety Code 779.001.”North East ISD is in compliance with this code and often provides additional AEDS on campus to provide one near the nurse’s office and one near the school’s gym/athletic area based on facility or building configuration. In addition, a defibrillator is made available during any University Interscholastic League (UIL) competition.

How many times a year are AEDs used in the district? Have we assessed the true need before spending $2,500 per device?

AED devices are typically used 2-3 times per year. Recent uses involved two incidents where school nurses utilized the AEDS at a campus. The third involved the use of an AED at the Blossom Athletic Center aquatics area. In cases of a serious cardiac emergencies, the AEDS can sometimes mean the difference between life and death for the person in need.

Are AEDs readily available for all extra curricular activities?

Yes, AED devices are readily available at each campus for all activities, including UIL competitions and practices. The Texas Education Code – Section 22.902 also mandates that “Each school nurse, assistant school nurse, athletic coach or sponsor, physical education instructor, marching band director, cheerleading coach, and any other school employee specified by the Commissioner, and each student who serves as an athletic trainer must participate and must receive and maintain certification in the use of an automated external defibrillator from the American Heart Association, the American Red Cross, or a similar nationally recognized association.”

Will there be any metal detectors installed?

Two walk-through portal type metal detectors are currently located at the Alternative Center. There are no plans at this time to install metal detectors at other campuses in the District, but hand-held wand type metal detectors will be available for random use at high schools and middle schools beginning with the 2015-2016 school year.

How will you assure that Title 1 schools get their safety needs met since our population is less likely to get involved and vote? Our kids have no coverage when the weather is bad. Dismissal is a nightmare. How can kids going in and out of buildings be safe when we have nothing but a saggy fence?

The District’s goal is to provide equity to schools. As part of the facility planning process, and, as evidenced by previous bond programs, the District has placed a large emphasis to the goal of funding campuses with needs such as covered walkways for extreme weather conditions. The amount of need is greater than any one bond package can address; therefore, the district has a history of addressing issues over multiple bond programs.

How old is your fleet of buses if the shelf life is 15 years?

The oldest year model/date of buses is 1999. NEISD presently has 31 buses that have reached 15 years and another 58 that will reach 16 years old in the next 2 years (89 buses total/20%).

Will the district purchase either vans or mini-buses for the district?

Bond funds may not be used to purchase vans or mini-buses. Statistics clearly reflect and prove that the school bus is the safest mode of transporting students between points A and B. NEISD is fortunate that our record confirms that track record in line with industry findings and analyses.

When there is a chronic bus driver shortage, purchase and use of smaller general purpose vehicles such as cars, mini-vans, and vans may seem to be a viable option for transporting students. The District has opted to use a commercial, state certified company to prototype vehicles such as cars and mini-vans to address routing issues of transporting a small number of students to and from locations in support of certain career and technology and magnet school programs. Should the result of this prototype program prove to be viable and a reasonable expense, the District will continue to employ this option in conjunction with bus fleet operations rather than purchasing additional vehicles and hiring of more personnel.

Another option that has been researched is the possibility of using smaller conventional-type buses or conventional-type activity buses rather than mini-vans in support of special programs.

Jackson has one of the oldest athletics facilities in the district. During athletics events Jackson is wide open. What can be done to make it safer?

During the facility planning process, consideration will be given to address athletic area needs across the District, including Jackson Middle School where items such as site drainage, fencing, bleachers and other security and safety needs can be addressed.

Another pool?

There are more than 320 students participating in North East High School Swimming & Diving Teams (322) and the about 570 participants in the North East Aquatic Team (Club swimming and diving). Additionally, the District offers swim lessons, water aerobics, open swim and adult lap swim to the community. The heavy usage of the district’s existing pool created a need for additional water to increase safety conditions during workout/training sessions. An additional pool would allow the District to better meet current demands and offer more classes to NEISD residents.

How can school safety be put aside for swimming pools?

A new pool or additional water will not take the place or push aside school safety as it will be addressed in a future bond, as well. School safety and pool safety are both very important issues within the school district and their facilities. Additional pool access will provide the opportunity to increase the ability to teach more children and adults how to survive in the water. Thus, allowing North East ISD the opportunity to assist in decreasing the number of drownings in our pools, lakes, and rivers.

What is the advantage of [artificial] turf?

Turf fields provide safe, playable conditions in different weather conditions with minimal upkeep compared to natural grass fields that can become dangerous in certain conditions and require large amounts of man hours and power to remain playable.

In light of recent discussions about health issues related to artificial turf, please advise as to the research the district has performed to ensure safety.

The athletic office has reviewed more than 25 research studies from the United States, Sweden and Europe. There is overwhelming evidence that artificial turf fields and the accompanying crumb rubber infill pose no additional health risk to the athletes who perform on them. No substances were measured at a higher concentration than what may be found in background typical air, soil and surrounding environment by each research study published and looked at by the school district. Each independent study has overwhelming statistics that show that cancer and other contracted illnesses are not caused by chemicals in manufactured turf or rubber crumb fills.

Is AstroTurf as safe as natural turf?

Synthetic turf poses no more risk to athletes than natural grass fields. There is no scientific link found between the materials that make up a synthetic field and any severe disease. There also is no greater risk for bacterial infection from synthetic fields as some studies found that grass fields contained more bacterial agents than synthetic fields. Finally, without proper maintenance, natural turf fields can become dangerous due to holes, water damage, and natural occurrences (damage caused by animals). Synthetic turf fields do not have these disadvantages.

Love asphalt tracks at elementary campuses to prepare for track. Will tracks be standard size?

Track size will depend on the available space at the campus, but typically the tracks are not competition or standard size. The tracks are considered walking tracks with smaller widths and less distance than tracks at the high school.

With such small time lengths for "recess" why do we see a need to spend on elementary tracks?

Tracks will be used for far more than recess. Tracks will be utilized by the physical education classes during the day and by the community in the evening. Additionally, the after-school KIN programs will be able to use the tracks with students.

Has there been consideration for lighting at the HS athletic fields?

No, the cost to install lighting at campus-based football, soccer, baseball and softball fields is an expensive endeavor. The District has central site facilities with lights to accommodate all varsity teams. All seven high school campuses are able to utilize their fields both in the fall and spring to capture daylight savings time without any issues. Soccer is a winter sport and campus games are started earlier to use natural light.

Has there been any thought to building a large gym open to students and employees?

There are numerous gyms and fitness centers available throughout the District and in San Antonio. For example, secondary campuses have weight and/or fitness rooms for student use. Some campuses also have facilities for staff use. Our district has also partnered with various fitness centers or programs for discounts for employees and runs a small exercise group at the Community Learning Center.

The priority for the Athletic office has always been the student/athlete and the programs under that umbrella. Littleton Gymnasium is used for student competitions and other activities such as homecoming dances, career night, fine arts programs, college night, elementary P.E. showcase, etc. A second central site gymnasium would relieve Littleton Gym from the constant nightly use and would be able to host even more district events.

How will the "selected" schools be selected for stage upgrades?

Selecting schools will be determined through the 2015 Facility Needs Survey and Campus Site visits.

How are elementary schools "selected" for things such as curtains for the stage?

Selecting schools will be determined through the 2015 Facility Needs Survey and Campus Site visits.

How will you determine the schools that will receive the cafetorium upgrades?

Selecting schools will be determined through the 2015 Facility Needs Survey and Campus Site visits.

How are the selected schools selected?

Selecting schools will be determined through the 2015 Facility Needs Survey and Campus Site visits.

Any discussion on improving acoustics in elementary cafeterias?

There are no current discussions about cafeteria acoustics.

Can all the middle schools get sound-proof practice rooms and recording equipment?

Some of the middle schools have sound-proof practice rooms. The need for rooms at other facilities will be determined through the Facility Needs survey.

The auditorium at Churchill in not comparable to the one at Johnson, Madison or Reagan. Is this equitable?

Auditorium renovation was addressed in a previous bond. The Churchill auditorium seating capacity is equitable to Johnson, Madison and Reagan.

Is there any discussion of a district fine arts center?

Over the years, there has been discussion of a district fine arts center. However, it is cost prohibitive.

Will you start with the campuses that are 10-12 years old when replacing copiers or will all campuses benefit?

Yes, most campus and department copiers are approximately the same age of 10-12 years old. The implementation plan is to replace the copiers at secondary campuses first, primary campuses second and finally, departments. We project that the implementation plan would take 1-2 months and could occur over a summer break. Every large and mid-volume copier is scheduled to be replaced; however, this is contingent on the final bond amount and the price of the copiers.

How can some campuses have SO many resources like copiers and laminators when other have old pathetic ones?

The District has a standard allocation of copiers per campus that has been in place since the copiers were replaced 10-12 years ago. Typically, one large volume copier (+75 pages per minute), one mid-volume copier (+50 Pages per minute) and one duplicator is provided at each elementary campus. Middle schools are equipped with two large volume copiers, one mid-volume copier and two duplicators in most cases. High Schools are equipped with three large volume copiers, two mid volume copiers and two duplicators, in general.

The large volume copiers and the duplicators are maintained by the district, which means there is no cost to the campus for repairs of this equipment. Should a campus request additional equipment, the equipment is provided to the campus and the campus must purchase a Maintenance Agreement from Copier Services. Organizations such as PTA may also purchase the equipment and a contract from Copier Services to maintain the equipment. The Maintenance Agreement for each piece of equipment ranges from $800-$1500 per device, annually.

Two years ago, the District provided additional funding to purchase at least one new copier for each campus. This was done as a stop-gap measure in order to reduce maintenance costs and provide new copier technology. The District has reached the point where the mid-volume copiers must be replaced when they fail because the replacement parts are no longer available. The District expects to encounter the same replacement parts issues with the large volume copiers within the next two years. The lack of space and/or electrical connections can be another reason for the lack of copier equipment at a campus.

How can we increase internet speed?

Many factors play a role in the user’s experience and perception of internet speed -- from the client device to the browser choice, from the application accessed to the age of the application, and from the wireless network to the wired network. Our current design is very robust and is not being challenged in any area except the age and density of the wireless network. The wireless network is being discussed.

Will one bond be enough to address network issues in the district at every school?

The 2011 Bond Program brought equity to every campus’ wired network. While every campus’ wireless network is equitable, the issue we currently face is the age and density of the wireless network.

How [do] you plan to assist students with school supplied devices when they have no internet access at home?

The District has investigated and invested in various student devices that can function with and without Internet connectivity. Many applications can be used offline.

We currently are conducting a pilot project with Krueger Middle School 7th grade students using funds from a grant to provide a Chromebook device for in-school and at-home use. We have advised the teachers to:

  1. Have alternate assignments for the student to complete
  2. Allow students to login to their device to complete the assignments in the morning before school, after school or other times during the school day
  3. save work at school to be able to work in the offline mode at home

Once students return to campus, the device will sync with the cloud storage at the time they open the device up.

How do we keep up [with technology changes every 5 years]?

The District has long practiced a 5 year obsolescence plan for computers and other technology devices. Since technology changes at such a rapid pace, members of the Technology Service department are exposed to new educational and business technology trends through a variety of methods including the following:

  • Professional development offered online and through face-to-face training events
  • Participation in annual state Educational Technology conference, as well as other conferences offered
  • Participation in vendor product “roadmap” discussions
How do you plan for obsoletion of current technology?

For the last several years, the District has practiced a five-year obsolescence plan largely funded by Bond elections. All equipment we purchase includes a manufacturer’s warranty. In some cases, we are able to negotiated extended warranties at no additional cost.

Do students in older campuses have technology equivalent to students in newer campuses? What is being done to equalize?

The 2011 Bond election allowed the District to establish a level of technology equity in terms of device quantity. The 2011 Bond proved every classroom in the District with no less than the following:

  • 3 iPads
  • 1 document camera
  • 1 interactive whiteboard

Some campuses have larger quantities of the above mentioned devices. The additional devices have been obtained through alternative funding sources such as, grants, PTA fundraisers and North East Educational Foundation donations. This proposed technology package includes a line item to increase the current District minimum standard of classroom technology quantities.

How many devices does a classroom need?

This question can be answered in many ways, but the answer depends on the instructional task. As technology has become more common in our students everyday life, we would like to make it more available to students throughout the academic day in order to engage them. Elementary teachers are asked to use a center-based approach in order to have multiple activities related to the subject matter being taught, which includes computers and/or mobile devices. For example, teachers conducting a whole class writing assignment will often bring in a cart of laptop computers so that each child has access to the technology. More and more textbook materials and ancillary materials are made available online and require some kind of mobile device to access. Therefore, we see the need for a 1:1 student to device ratio becoming a greater need.

Does the budget proposal including maintenance costs to keep the devices up and working if not student owned?

Yes. All equipment we purchase includes a manufacturer’s warranty. In some cases, we are able to negotiated extended warranties at no additional cost. We have included a proposed line item that includes the replacement of consumables such as laptop batteries and digital projector replacement bulbs.

How do we approach BYOD?

Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) is approached from several different facets. The District network infrastructure must be redesigned to ensure an acceptable level of connectivity is established for the large influx of personal electronic devices. Security measures must also be implemented that prevent the unauthorized access of District information. The District’s Student/Parent Handbook, as well as Digital Citizenship courses, continues to be updated as District policy and expectation change.

How far away is 1 to 1 for ALL facilities in the district?

The technology portion of the 2011 Bond provided each District classroom with access to no less than three iPads. It will take several Bond programs to provide every student with a District-provided student device. Fortunately, this proposed Bond package also contains funding to create a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) network, which will provide connectivity for students’ personal devices.

When will we, as a district, discontinue using hardback textbooks and move to e-books?

Throughout recent textbook adoptions, the District has included the publisher’s digital offering as part of the physical textbook’s purchase. Unfortunately, the District does not have enough student devices at this time to provide a 1:1 device to student ratio in every classroom. Aside from digital textbooks, the District’s Library Services department has invested in e-book purchases over the past several years. These digital resources may be borrowed from the campus and viewed on students’ personal electronic devices or on devices loaned from the campus library.

Will there be online text books? Online text books do not match the hard copy. Many are off format and not a true textbook.

Throughout recent textbook adoptions, the District has included the publisher’s digital offering as part of the physical textbook’s purchase. The functionality and aesthetics of digital textbooks varies widely between publishers.

Will this include upgrades to campus infrastructure for whole school video presentations?

The District has been piloting an IP delivered video system at new campuses and construction renovation projects. It allows for the storage of videos for instruction as well as the ability to stream videos for morning announcements. This technology would also be available to students at home. There is funding in the proposed technology package to provide this system to all campuses.

Will this include the needs of our cyberpatriot programs?

No. The student devices identified in the proposed technology package are meant for the general population of students at each campus. Existing District Cyberpatriot teams use computers that are not utilized for instruction. These computers were either donated or purchased specifically for Cyberpatriot activities.

Is audio equipment a priority for the district?

The proposed technology package contains a line item to purchase and install classroom voice amplification systems.

Can technology be tracked by use and if not being used transferred to another campus that will use it?

Some of the classroom technology devices can be monitored for usage rates. Rather than contribute to technology inequity among NEISD campuses by transferring equipment from one site to another, members of the Instructional Technology department help integrate the use of technology into the lesson cycle. This is accomplished by Instructional Technology Specialists planning, model teaching and observing classrooms teachers utilizing their classroom technology.

Can bond funds be applied to training employees on new technologies as they come out?

Bond funds generated by the I&S (debt service) tax rate cannot pay for a professional development. The district’s Maintenance & Operations (M&O) tax revenue funds the day-to-day operations of the school district, which includes employee salaries, professional development, etc. Members of the Instructional Technology department are responsible for providing both online and face-to-face training for new and existing technology.

Does funding include money to replace current student information system?

Yes. There is a line item in the proposed technology package that addresses the costs associated with the hardware, software, licensing and implementation fees of a new student information system.



[05.19.15]

Why build a new elementary? Why not rezone/reset boundaries?

Analysis regarding possible boundary changes in the north east quadrant of NEISD predicts that current elementary schools will exceed their optimal limits in the next five years. Although the Bulverde Creek attendance zone is a large area, the planning of the boundary was developed in anticipation for growth. The goal is to limit boundary changes in that area as future development occurs. Enrollment projections for Bulverde Creek elementary will exceed 2,000 students, creating the need for a second campus by 2020. Reorganization by equally distributing enrollment between the existing four campuses north of 1604, east of 281 have been considered. Balancing enrollment between Bulverde Creek, Cibolo Green, Encino Park, and Roan Forest would not only exceed the 800-1000 optimal limit for appropriate elementary school size, but would also surpass the 95% utilization of the campuses by 2020. Adjusting school boundaries in this area could affect neighborhood integrity and increase travel distance for residents in those areas.

Can boundary changes reduce the need to build additional classrooms in some schools?

There are many considerations made in the process of boundary changes, such as future enrollment projections, campus enrollment history, housing development, facility usage, age of existing portable buildings, and NEISD’s Board Goals and Assumptions. Boundary changes may not always align with a majority of the goals. Examples of goals include: boundaries should remain as stable as possible over time and should be minimized in order to maintain neighborhood integrity where possible, plans for proposed facilities should match anticipated needs, and boundaries should maximize the opportunity for students to participate in after school activities.

Are boundary changes being considered to address overcrowding?

There are many considerations made in the process of boundary changes, such as future enrollment projections, campus enrollment history, housing development, facility usage, age of existing portable buildings, and NEISD’s Board Goals and Assumptions. Boundary changes may not always align with a majority of the goals. Examples of goals include: boundaries should remain as stable as possible over time and should be minimized in order to maintain neighborhood integrity where possible, plans for proposed facilities should match anticipated needs, and boundaries should maximize the opportunity for students to participate in after school activities.

High growth in the north east quadrant of NEISD can be addressed with one new elementary campus. Analysis regarding possible boundary changes in the north east quadrant of NEISD predicts that current elementary schools will exceed their optimal limits in the next five years. Although the Bulverde Creek attendance zone is a large area, the planning of the boundary was developed in anticipation for growth. The goal is to limit boundary changes in that area as future development occurs. Enrollment projections for Bulverde Creek elementary will exceed 2,000 students, creating the need for a second campus by 2020. Reorganization by equally distributing enrollment between the existing four campuses north of 1604, east of 281 have been considered. Balancing enrollment between Bulverde Creek, Cibolo Green, Encino Park, and Roan Forest would not only exceed the 800-1000 optimal limit for appropriate elementary school size, but would also surpass the 95% utilization of the campuses by 2020. Adjusting school boundaries in this area could affect neighborhood integrity and increase travel distance for residents in those areas.

Any thought to just redoing the boundaries to help instead of building another elementary in the north?

Analysis regarding possible boundary changes in the north east quadrant of NEISD predicts that current elementary schools will exceed their optimal limits in the next five years. Although the Bulverde Creek attendance zone is a large area, the planning of the boundary was developed in anticipation for growth. The goal is to limit boundary changes in that area as future development occurs. Enrollment projections for Bulverde Creek elementary will exceed 2,000 students, creating the need for a second campus by 2020. Reorganization by equally distributing enrollment between the existing four campuses north of 1604, east of 281 have been considered. Balancing enrollment between Bulverde Creek, Cibolo Green, Encino Park, and Roan Forest would not only exceed the 800-1000 optimal limit for appropriate elementary school size, but would also surpass the 95% utilization of the campuses by 2020. Adjusting school boundaries in this area could affect neighborhood integrity and increase travel distance for residents in those areas. High growth in the north east quadrant of NEISD can be addressed with one new elementary campus.

There are elementary schools with several empty classrooms; why not fill them first?

Massive boundary changes throughout NEISD is highly unlikely. Discussions about large scale boundary changes in efforts to balance Districtwide distribution of students are not considered at this time due to the anticipation of growth from programs such as dual language and PreK at numerous campuses. While many campuses have extra classrooms, those with programs will require the use of these empty classrooms. A facility usage study is conducted annually and throughout the year as inquiries arise. Priority is given to the use of classrooms for instructional purposes and is dependent on campus needs and programs.

Enrollment projections and future potential housing development in the north east quadrant will need to be addressed by the construction of a new elementary campus. Changing boundaries in that area will not provide relief to the campuses that currently exist there. Balancing enrollment, by equally distributing enrollment between Bulverde Creek, Cibolo Green, Encino Park, and Roan Forest would not only exceed the 800-1000 optimal limit for appropriate elementary school enrollments, but would also surpass the 95% utilization of the campuses by 2020.

How can there be schools with empty classrooms and others who are bursting at their seams? Shouldn't those small schools who are overflowing get prior?

Massive boundary changes throughout NEISD is highly unlikely. Discussions about large scale boundary changes in efforts to balance Districtwide distribution of students are not considered at this time due to the anticipation of growth from programs such as dual language and PreK at numerous campuses. While many campuses have extra classrooms, those with additional programs will require the use of these empty classrooms. A facility usage study is conducted annually and throughout the year as inquiries arise. Priority is given to the use of classrooms for instructional purposes and is dependent on campus needs and programs.

Has reorganization of school boundaries been considered?

The District carefully monitors student enrollment and facility usage. There are many considerations made in the process of boundary changes, such as future enrollment projections, campus enrollment history, housing development, facility usage, age of existing portable buildings, and NEISD’s Board Goals and Assumptions. Boundary changes may not always align with a majority of the goals. Examples of goals include: boundaries should remain as stable as possible over time and should be minimized in order to maintain neighborhood integrity where possible, plans for proposed facilities should match anticipated needs, and boundaries should maximize the opportunity for students to participate in after school activities.

Why can't we re-zone when we have empty schools in some areas and overflowing ones in others? If we empty portables why can't we have them?

There are many considerations made in the process of boundary changes, such as future enrollment projections, campus enrollment history, housing development, facility usage, age of existing portable buildings, and NEISD’s Board Goals and Assumptions. Boundary changes may not always align with a majority of the goals. Examples of goals include: boundaries should remain as stable as possible over time and should be minimized in order to maintain neighborhood integrity where possible, plans for proposed facilities should match anticipated needs, and boundaries should maximize the opportunity for students to participate in after school activities.

A facility usage study is conducted annually and throughout the year as inquiries arise. It is very costly to move portables throughout the District; therefore, staff carefully review numerous factors before planning a portable move.

Whose poor planning made the Bulverde Creek attendance zone so much bigger than the others?

Although the Bulverde Creek attendance zone is a large area, the planning of the boundary was developed in anticipation for growth. The goal is to limit boundary changes in that area as future development occurs. There are many considerations made in the development of school boundaries, such as future enrollment projections, campus enrollment history, housing development, facility usage, age of existing portable buildings, and NEISD’s Board Goals and Assumptions. Examples of goals include: boundaries should remain as stable as possible over time and should be minimized in order to maintain neighborhood integrity where possible, plans for proposed facilities should match anticipated needs, and boundaries should maximize the opportunity for students to participate in after school activities.

To continue to improve the older schools why can't we crowd the elementary schools outside 1604?

Massive boundary changes throughout NEISD is highly unlikely. Discussions about large scale boundary changes in efforts to balance Districtwide distribution of students are not considered at this time due to the anticipation of growth from programs such as dual language and PreK at numerous campuses. Currently, the optimal limit of approximately 800-1000 is appropriate for elementary school enrollments at new and rebuilt facilities to maintain the safety of our children. Schools throughout the District have different capacity.

Why not two new elementary [schools]?

The 10 year enrollment projections currently do not show a need for a second elementary campus. High growth in the north east quadrant of NEISD can be addressed with one new elementary campus.

If you project the need of a new [elementary] school, why isn't there the projection of a high school since it's that same area?

Currently, there are no plans for a new high school due to a recent 24 classroom addition currently under construction at Reagan high school.

Could a small elementary school of around 300 students be closed and combined to a nearby campus by expanding classroom space?

Decisions to close neighborhood schools is a very sensitive topic. NEISD strives to consider the impact on the community and the students it serves.

Are there campuses that are not using all available classroom space? Not at capacity?

While many campuses have extra classrooms, additional programs, such as dual language and PreK, will require the use of these empty classrooms. Both of these programs are expected to grow, and the District will need classrooms to cluster programs at campuses. A facility usage study is conducted annually and throughout the year as inquiries arise. Priority is given to the use of classrooms for instructional purposes and is dependent on campus needs and programs.

If an elementary campus has classrooms being used as district testing rooms or supervisor offices, why not use those classrooms for students?

A facility usage study is conducted annually and throughout the year as inquiries arise. Priority is given to the use of classrooms for instructional purposes and is dependent on campus needs and programs.

Do we need boundary changes to move any students at existing schools?

Massive boundary changes throughout NEISD is highly unlikely. Discussions about large scale boundary changes in efforts to balance Districtwide distribution of students are not considered at this time due to the anticipation of growth from programs such as dual language and PreK at numerous campuses. While many campuses have extra classrooms, those with programs will require the use of these empty classrooms. A facility usage study is conducted annually and throughout the year as inquiries arise. Priority is given to the use of classrooms for instructional purposes and is dependent on campus needs and programs.

Enrollment projections and future potential housing development in the north east quadrant will need to be addressed by the construction of a new elementary campus. Changing boundaries in that area will not provide relief to the campuses that currently exist there. Balancing enrollment, by equally distributing enrollment between Bulverde Creek, Cibolo Green, Encino Park, and Roan Forest would not only exceed the 800-1000 optimal limit for appropriate elementary school enrollments, but would also surpass the 95% utilization of the campuses by 2020.

We are slated for portables this year...can we get the modular wings instead?

The District currently has two modular portable units, one at Wilderness Oak and one at Canyon Ridge. Due to high growth in the north east quadrant, NEISD is moving the Canyon Ridge unit to Cibolo Green, as they are already over the 95% utilization. Wilderness Oak will keep their modular unit until a need arises elsewhere since moving it is very costly to the District. NEISD strives to be fiscally responsible and monitors needs throughout the school year. During recent facility planning activities, all stakeholders of the district (staff, taxpayers, parents) were asked for their input on needs of the district facilities. Those suggestions were reviewed by NEISD planning staff and the Facility Steering Committee.

Are the modular units at Wilderness and Canyon Ridge still being utilized?

The District currently has two modular portable units, one at Wilderness Oak and one at Canyon Ridge. Due to high growth in the north east quadrant, NEISD is moving the Canyon Ridge unit to Cibolo Green, as they are already over the 95% utilization. Wilderness Oak will keep their modular unit until a need arises elsewhere since moving it is very costly to the District. NEISD strives to be fiscally responsible and monitors needs throughout the school year. During recent facility planning activities, all stakeholders of the district (staff, taxpayers, parents) were asked for their input on needs of the district facilities. Those suggestions were reviewed by NEISD planning staff and the Facility Steering Committee.

What is the SAFE capacity number of students at high school level?

The board goal is to limit high schools to approximately 2500 - 3000 student enrollments at new and rebuilt facilities.

What about a construction careers academy?

This is currently being considered.

Why does Reagan need [a] new JROTC [facility]?

The Reagan JROTC program is the only program in the district with the JROTC facilities configured inside the main building and has the smallest square footage allocation. The location and facilities have been overgrown and the capability of the program has been stifled. Classroom space, storage, dressing rooms and offices are inadequate. The Air Rifle Range and Gallery area (equipment storage and seating) is crowded with lockers for the shooters unique uniforms and secured rifle storage. The gallery area does not have adequate seating, and the range is not equipped with adequate minimum lighting required for Air Rifle practice and/or competitions. The range is currently outfitted with home- made target traps to hold paper targets and stop the pellets. The range needs to have electronic targets installed to assist participant progress to the highest level of competitive air rifle marksmanship. Additionally, the marching drill pad is located on the south side of main academic building requiring the student cadets to traverse through the building from the north side to the south side of the building to access the current drill pad area. This situation creates supervision and perception problems with administrators, teachers and campus visitors.

Why does Reagan get its own line item for ROTC but other schools will be "selected"?

The line item for a Reagan JROTC facility came from a need identified by the Director of Army Instruction during the facility needs survey. The wording “selected” campus sites is an effort to combine, without naming each site individually, the needed facilities and equipment upgrades also identified in the survey. For example, the locker room and shower facilities renovation needed at Madison High Schools JROTC building can be a part of the overall “facilities” renovations addressed at many campus sites. Additionally, the purchase and installation of Electronic Targeting Systems at the four “selected” campus sites of Roosevelt, Johnson, Madison and Reagan will materially assist each of the campus sites to be equitable outfitted and provide the opportunity for the student/cadet to perform at the highest levels of marksmanship competition.

Are there plans for housing development South of 1604 on Bulverde Road and if so how will the district meet those needs?

The Master Plan has not been developed at this time, but there is land for potential growth (Pape Ranch). The district continues to monitor development.

Where can we read the bond presentation?

The presentation delivered at the community meetings on May 19 and May 20, 2015 are available here.

Will there be an itemized version of the general proposal we saw tonight?

A Proposed Bond Program Summary is located here. An itemized version that shows all project locations and details is still under development.

Any chance to get this down to $450M?

The Facility Steering Committee will review proposal options and provide a recommendation to the Board of Trustees. The final budget amount will be an important decision in their recommendation.

At Lee, why not build an additional auditorium and keep the old one as well?

The Proposed Bond Program Summary presented at the May 19 and May 20 community meetings does fund an additional Fine Arts Center, including theatre, at Lee High School. The old auditorium would remain under this plan.



[05.27.15]

In a world where this bond issue fails, will the district be able to find some of these project through normal operating funds?

No, the District will not be able to fund these projects through the local Maintenance and Operations budget. In 2011, the Texas Legislature reduced funding to public schools that has not been fully restored. In 2014-15, NEISD operated with about $14.8 million less in operating funds per year than it would have prior to the 2011 cuts. Once you adjust for inflation, the actual shortfall is closer to $60.5 million ANNUALLY, almost a 12% reduction in operating revenue.

Who determines what schools are selected [for fine arts projects]?

The Fine arts staff, Construction Management, Engineering staff, Campus Principals and the Facility Planning Committee are all involved in identifying, prioritizing and making recommendations for school and project selection.

Can there be shower locker rooms in the band hall?

Shower/Locker Rooms are not currently being considered as the need for those facilities and have not been communicated as a need by Band Directors. Other band facility needs have been communicated as high priority, but not locker room/showers.

Johnson band has two classrooms. Why do they need more?

The current second Johnson Band “classroom” is simply a reconfiguration of space that combines ensemble rooms on other campuses. Currently, many of our band facilities either have one large Bandhall and two medium size ensemble rooms, or one Large Bandhall and one “classroom,” but no ensemble rooms (Johnson). The latest district standard is to incorporate both into our facilities.



[06.17.15]

Why is the proposed Bond have a line item, in Category 1 – Safety & Security of Folding Accordion Partitions? This type of partitions are being replaced with permeant studs and gypsum wallboard walls?

Across the district, there are several older campuses that have an open classroom design concept with folding accordion partitions to separate instructional areas. Item 1a on the Bond Program Worksheet will provide the opportunity to replace the existing folding partition walls with permanent walls or with new replacement partitions (based on building/fire code egress requirements). This item is listed under the Safety and Security project category because the District believes that non-functioning accordion walls may present a safety concern if they cannot be locked in a “lock down” procedure or if it they cannot be easily opened in an evacuation situation.

The District will replace folding accordion partitions with permanent walls when possible. We must follow building/fire code egress requirements to ensure that there is still a corridor available if an accordion wall is replaced with a permanent wall. If there is not sufficient access, non-functioning accordion walls will be replaced with new ones.

With regards to the security budget, what security oversights currently exist to warrant an increase in budget?

The additional funds identified in the Safety and Security project category are considered a need for enhancing security across the District. The projects proposed on the Bond Program Worksheet were recommended by the District's Safety and Security Committee of 31 representatives from campuses and central office departments. For example, North East ISD has security cameras at all campuses and facilities, but new digital technology offers clearer images that can better identify facial features and vehicle license plates.

Another example of an enhancement would be to incorporate keyless access controls and proxy tags at strategic entry points throughout the school district to replace some traditional door locks that mandate a system of complicated key control procedures. As technology continues to advance, it is important for the school district to consider cost-effective utilization of the technology to assist with enhancing security and safety for students, staff and our school district visitors. Safety and security have been addressed in past bond programs, as well, although items were not listed under that specific heading.